Alaska Native/Indigenous People

Poem by Crystal Dzehgak Frank

Crystal Dzehgak Frank and her late Shitsuu Naomi. Courtesy photo

Crystal Dzehgak Frank’s mom, Caroline Tritt-Frank, was recently featured on the Athabascan Woman Blog. Dzehgak shared her poetry with me and graciously agreed to share one of them. It is a beautiful tribute to her late grandmother or shitsuu, Naomi Tritt (Gwich’in) ~ 1926-2017. Continue reading “Poem by Crystal Dzehgak Frank”

Alaska Native/Indigenous People, Athabascan in the Spotlight

Caroline Tritt-Frank – Gwich’in Language Educator

Caroline Tritt-Frank studying by headlamp. Photo by Kenneth Frank

Caroline Tritt-Frank (Gwich’in) was recently named a 2020 Distinguished Alumnus Award winner through the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF)! I reached out to her to learn more about her and her accomplishments. UAF alumni are selected for the award based on meritorious service on behalf of UAF, distinguished accomplishments in business and professional life, or distinguished human service in community affairs. She is a lead teacher at the Fairbanks Native Association. Continue reading “Caroline Tritt-Frank – Gwich’in Language Educator”

Alaska Native/Indigenous People

Odin Peter-Raboff – Gwich’in & Koyukon Business Owner

Odin Peter-Raboff. Courtesy photo

I recently ran into a friend, Odin Peter-Raboff (Gwich’in/Koyukon Athabascan). He is the owner of Nomadic Stars, and they do screen printing and create promotional items in Fairbanks. You may occasionally see them at a booth at the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention and other events. He expanded his business to Anchorage recently and I asked him if he’d would share about it.

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My name is Odin Peter-Raboff. My grandfather was the late Steven Peter of Arctic Village and the late Katherine Peter of Steven’s Village, Fort Yukon and Arctic Village. My mother is Adeline Raboff of Arctic Village and Fort Yukon and my father was the late Ernest Raboff of California and New Jersey. Continue reading “Odin Peter-Raboff – Gwich’in & Koyukon Business Owner”

Alaska Native culture

Tell Your Story

Koyukuk River north of Huslia. Photo by Angela Łot’oydaatlno Gonzalez

Since I’ve had the Athabascan Woman Blog, people have asked me how to start a blog. I want to share some tips about how to get started and other ways to share your story.

Expressing yourself and publishing your creative work has never been easier, thanks to the blog. Blogging can be an avenue for advocacy to speak out on important issues in your community. Some sample blogging platforms include Wordress, Blogger, Tumblr and Weebly. Most are user friendly.

I share my stories, interviews with Indigenous people, photography, ‘how to’ bead videos and tips, and more. But I’ve seen blogs dedicated to photography, vlogging and podcasting. Find out the medium that interests you and try it. Ask people for advice. Continue reading “Tell Your Story”

Alaska Native culture

Traditional Ways of Life

I shared a picture of a young Gwich’in woman, Quannah Potts, on the Athabascan Woman Blog Facebook page. Quannah Potts says, “This year, I was blessed with shooting my first caribou and our future generations should have the same privilege of being able to hunt and live their ways of life.”

Someone said, “Although using rifles and snowmobiles, ATVs and the like is hardly ‘traditional’…..”

I responded by thanking him for his comment… It brings to light one of the reason I write and share on my blog. The act of spending time on the land and providing for her family is traditional. The tradition of giving parts of the caribou from first catches to Elders or other families is traditional. Alaska Native would not have survived 10,000+ years if we were not adaptable. We moved around on the land with the seasons and the availability of plants, animals, currents, cycles and conditions. We were not static people living in one certain way. I would not expect people to be driving around by horse and buggy from a century+ ago. The only people who can critique Quannah on whether or not she is traditional is her mother, grandparents and community Elders.

I’ve had conversations about what is traditional and contemporary. I say living our ways of life is traditional whether or not we use contemporary tools.

When we give our first catch to Elders or other family members despite shooting with a rifle – that’s traditional.

When we sometimes sing and dance despite it being with a fiddle – that’s traditional.

When we celebrate a memorial potlatch despite it being in a school gym vs. a community hall – that’s traditional.

When we pick berries despite using an ATV or boat – that’s traditional.

When my family fishes despite using a commercial fish net vs. a fish trap – that’s traditional.

When I bead slipper tops on smoked moose skin despite being on hard bottom moccasins – that’s traditional.

When I use beads in my beadwork introduced in the past couple of centuries despite it not being quills – that’s traditional.

When I learn and share the Denaakk’e language despite being on a paper book, by video or audio recording – that’s traditional.

When I share stories despite it being on a blog vs. oratory – that’s traditional.

What would you add? We need to continue sharing our perspectives, stories, culture, language and ways of life. Enaa baasee’.