Alaska Native/Indigenous People

Athabascan Adoptee Welcomed Home

Mary St. Martin-Charles is greeted by family in Koyukuk in the summer of 2015. Courtesy photo
Mary St. Martin-Charles is greeted by family in Koyukuk in the summer of 2015. Courtesy photo

This Athabascan Adoptee Welcomed Home article was republished with permission from the American Indian Indian Adoptees Blog.

By Mary St. Martin-Charles

I’ve always dreamt in Indian. Vivid, lucid, in color and shaded with symbols. On one evening night quest, my body was carried in a stream. The water above and below me flowed horizontally from my head toward my toes. However, my body was carried in a current of its own and moving me ahead. As I approached a steep hill, I began to struggle. My brief panic subsided when I chose not to lose my strength fighting the elements I could not control. I reached deep in cool water with both hands. Wading below were fish that sucked on my fingers and pulled me the rest of the way home. I think I am a Salmon. Instinctively, I was called home.

In the year of 2014, I located my cousins and my Koyukon Athabascan tribe. I was welcomed with tears. Even my first cousin, Barb, felt like she needed to have a baby shower for me. When my tax return came in February 2015, the first thing I did was make reservations from Los Angeles to Fairbanks, Alaska and a second reservation with a bush plane to fly me to the village of Koyukuk. The Native Village of Koyukuk lies where the Koyukuk River meets the Yukon River. Koyukuk is about 300 miles from Fairbanks. There is no running water to the cabins and are no roads in and out.

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