Growing Up Native: Sharing Culture

Singing at WEIO
Singing at WEIO

I’m fortunate that I grew up in a home where it was okay to be Native (aka Alaska Native, Athabascan, American Indian). My mother taught us about our Koyukon Athabascan culture. My grandmother shared stories. My dad taught us how to hunt, fish and take care of dogs. We were encouraged to share our culture with others.

I once competed to be Miss World Eskimo Indian Olympics (WEIO). That spring and summer, I learned a Koyukon Athabascan song, called “Good Bye My Sonny”. My family and friends of the family sewed traditional Athabascan regalia, including a dress, boots, gloves, belt and jewelry. We all came together to learn more about what it meant to be Athabascan. I didn’t win that year, but I had the opportunity to share what it meant to be Koyukon Athabascan. I did win an award for the best traditional dress.

My mother, Eleanor Yatlin, and I
My mother, Eleanor Yatlin, and I

Participating in WEIO as an athlete, dancer, artist, ambassador or even in the audience is a great learning experience. WEIO will celebrate its 50th Anniversary on July 20-23, 2011 in Fairbanks, Alaska. Many of my friends and family will go to the interior for this momentous celebration. I hope to make it up also.

The experience of running for Miss WEIO prepared me for becoming Miss Indian TU (University of Tulsa). Serving as a cultural ambassador allowed me to learn even more about what it means to be Koyukon Athabascan and Alaska Native. I learned how to properly introduce myself. People know you by whose family you belong to. Alaska Native people ask me where I am from and who I’m related to.

An Alaska Native Introduction
I’m Angela Yatlin Gonzalez, originally from Huslia, Alaska. My Koyukon Athabascan name is Kla’dah Dalthna’. My parents are Al and Eleanor Yatlin.

My grandmothers, Lydia Simon and Alda Frank
My grandmothers, Lydia Simon and Alda Frank

My grandparents on my mother’s side were the late Edwin and Lydia Simon. My grandparents on my father’s side were the late George Frank and Minnie Yatlin, and Alda Frank (my grandfather’s second wife who currently lives in Galena, Alaska).

I surrounded myself with people who appreciated my unique cultural background. I hear stories of people who experienced racism. I experienced some too, and try to educate people when I can. Some people may look at me and see a stereotype, but there are a lot of good things out there too. Alaska Natives, like athlete Callan Chythlook-Sifsof, are breaking new ground and accomplishing great things. Learn more about some exemplary Alaska Natives in a book, Growing Up Native in Alaska by A J McClanahan.

Alaska Native people like to share their culture and enjoy reconnecting with each other to share food, songs and dance. I strive to learn about the many other cultures. To that end, I encourage you to share something about yourself in the comments below. Who are you? Whose family do you come from?

Anaa basee’ (Thank you) for allowing me to share a little bit about my culture!

2 thoughts on “Growing Up Native: Sharing Culture”

  1. Chiqinik (thank you) for your blog, I ran accross it while looking up tradiional introductions. My name is Vide Kroto, I am Dena’ina Athabascan from the Native Village of Tyonek. My Parents are the Violet Kroto and the late Adam Kroto of Tyonek. My Grandma Is Doris Nicoli from Kuskatan and my Grandma on my dad’s side is Josephine Petrof from Susitna Station. Just wanted to say I enjoyed your blog, and hope to here more from your area, my friend is Koyakon and she doesnt know to much of the area as she was raised in the Talkeetna area, I where your from sparked my interest as well. Funny how traditional introductions connects people in way that western intductions takes a lot of time to make any connections. Once again Chiqinik

    1. Thank you Vide. Please let me know if you would like to be featured on the Athabascan Woman Blog. I can interview you.

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