Alaska life

Dipnetting on the Kenai Peninsula

We got some nice sized red (sockeye) salmon on the Kenai River. Photo by Angela Gonzalez
We got some nice sized red (sockeye) salmon on the Kenai River. Photo by Angela Gonzalez

When I was a kid, we went to fish camp each summer up and down the Koyukuk River. I’ve written about it a couple times on the Athabascan Woman blog.

I also shared my story about cutting fish on the Salmon Project website. You can also submit and share your story about salmon on the Salmon Project website.

Each summer, my family goes dipnetting for salmon on the Kenai and Kasilof Rivers. My daughter, Janessa, and I created a short video of our experience.

If you are planning to go dipnetting for the first time, here is a supply list that might help you get started. I’m sure there is a lot more information about it online. Be sure to research the rules and regulations on the Alaska Department of Fish and Game website.

Dipnetting Supplies

  • Dipnet
  • Scissors to cut fins
  • Knife to fillet fish
  • Fish club
  • Cutting board, table or surface to gut fish
  • Chest Waders
  • Hat and gloves (waterproof)
  • Rain jacket if needed
  • Extra set of clothes
  • Food and beverages
  • Bucket to wash fish
  • Cooler
  • Fishing license and harvest ticket
  • Other camping supplies to be comfortable
  • Extra person to assist

I am sure I’m missing something from this list. Feel free to comment below with any other supplies you would bring. What tips do you have for newbies?

Here is a photo of my husband and daughter from our trip to the mouth of the Kenai River in July. It takes about 2.5-3 hours to drive down to the Kenai River from Anchorage.

Sarbelio and his daughter, Janessa, at the mouth of the Kenai River. Photo by Angela Gonzalez
Sarbelio and his daughter, Janessa, at the mouth of the Kenai River. Photo by Angela Gonzalez

My husband, Sarbelio, cuts the salmon. We all work as a team to cut up and put the salmon in our freezer. We eat it over the winter.

Sarbelio fillets some red (sockeye) salmon in Anchorage. Photo by Angela Gonzalez
Sarbelio fillets some red (sockeye) salmon in Anchorage. Photo by Angela Gonzalez

Salmon supplement our food supply over the winter. It tastes great, and there are a lot of ways to preserve, prepare and cook salmon. I feel grateful that I can still harvest salmon like my ancestors did, even though it is in a different way.

 

3 thoughts on “Dipnetting on the Kenai Peninsula”

  1. Such a beautiful video – subsistence, family, outdoors and youth! I had no idea that it was like that down there! I will share on my Facebook. I know I have friends outside and in Africa, etc. who would love to see this too! Thanks for sharing, Amy

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