Alaska Native/Indigenous People

Indigenous People to Follow

I want to give a shout-out to some writers, podcasters, photographers, creators, beaders and Native royalty to consider following in honor of Alaska Native and American Indian Heritage Month.

Alice Qannik Glenn (Iñupiaq) started a podcast, called Coffee and Quaq, this summer. She describes it as:  “Coffee & Quaq provides a platform for the generation of Alaska Natives who continue practicing cultural traditions, but also enjoy the modern commodities of the millennial era like Mario Kart, iPhones, and Tang.  Coffee & Quaq? It’s a great time to be alive.” Her latest episode was, LGBTQ in the Native Community. I’m looking forward to what she’s creating! She is the first Alaska Native podcaster I know of!

Jen Jul (Athabascan) is documenting her life and building up her business in Denmark as a social media strategist on her new blog, My Kind of Jen. She’s trying to make a life for herself with her family and new life. Give her a follow on Facebook too. She’s an excellent photographer too. I worked with her over 25 years ago in a college summer job. 

Susie Lee Edwardson (Haida) of Haida Life created a “Native YouTubers” Twitter account @NativeTubers. You may recall she shared a list of Native Vloggers, Gamers and Organizations on the Athabascan Woman Blog a couple years ago. I love how she shares her language journey and teaching Haida. @NativeTubers is a great way to share content of indigenous vloggers/sharers! 

While you’re on Twitter, give a follow to Speak Gwich’in To Me. Jacey Firth has been sharing her Gwich’in language journey in Canada. Check out this documentary about her here!

While you are on Twitter, give Indigenous Beads a follow. @IndigenousBeads is a new host every week with about six regulars. I have hosted it a few times over the past year or so. The hosts share beadwork, process, how people can purchase their items, and much more. If you are a fan of beadwork, you’ll want to give them a follow. It’s a great way to converse with other beaders across the Nation.

If you are looking for inspiration from Indian Country, follow up-and-comer Tanaya Winder on Girl On Fire. She is a writer, educator, motivational speaker, and performance poet from the Southern Ute, Duckwater Shoshone, and Pyramid Lake Paiute Nations. Tanaya came up to Alaska earlier this year, and shared her spoken poetry, book and sang with Frank Waln. I love how she uplifts people with her strong voice. She fill people up (especially young Indigenous people) with light in the way they need to be filled up, which is healing. She even has a TedTalk!

 

Photo by Cordelia Kellie of the Nalliq Blog

Follow Cordelia Qiġñaaq Kellie (Iñupiaq) on Nalliq. She shares her perspectives. Cordelia shared this in her latest post was:  Stories in Representation: First figurative sculpture of Dena’ina installed in Anchorage

“Soldotna Artist Joel Isaak, who is Dena’ina, wrought the bronze statue to represent a well known Dena’ina community member, Grandma Olga Nicolai Ezi from the Tyone Lake, and Copper River regions. Born in 1875, she was the matriarch of her family and was married to Simeon Ezi, a chief of the upper Cook Inlet, including Anchorage and the Matanuska Valley and was known as Cheda, or Grandmother, by the region.”

Here are a few articles to read in the news about Alaska Native people:

  • Check out the interview with Irene Bedard (Iñupiaq) in the Anchorage Press. Thank you to her sister-in-law, Vera Bedard, for pointing it out. Vera says, she “talks about Pocahontas, Smoke Signals, Native issues advocacy, and really everything else!” According the article, Bedard will spend much of her time in Alaska through the spring as artist-in-residence with Perseverance Theatre, which is celebrating its 40th season, and its first since nearly going under in 2018.
  • Lt. Gov. Valerie Davidson (Yup’ik) shared her story as a sexual abuse survivor on KTUU, in an article entitled, ‘In my childhood the monsters were very real’ — Lt. Gov. Valerie Davidson talks about childhood trauma. She is using her voice to bring light to this critical issue. She says,”I think it gets fixed by us bringing light to the issue and shining the harsh light of judgement and reality every time that that injustice happens, because we deserve justice, just as everybody else does, and it’s not OK that that continues to happen.” I appreciate and admire her strength in speaking up for so many people who suffer in silence. I’m a Val fan and love seeing an Alaska Native woman as lieutenant governor!
  • Bob Sam (Tlingit) and other Alaska Native people visited the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania. Photo journalist Daniella Zalcman shared the story on the Pulitzer Center, entitled Carlisle and the Indian Boarding School Legacy in America. I was there with the Alaskans. It was a very powerful experience, while I attended the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition.
  • Emil Notti (Koyukon Athabascan) said a movie should be made on Percy Blatchford (Iñupiaq). Emil shared some pretty amazing stories of Percy’s life, and it really seemed like he was a Native James Bond in his time. I was happy to see this article by Michael Hankins, which was published in the Last Frontier Magazine and it was republished by the ECHO. It is entitled, Percy Blatchford – Alaska Legend.
  • Read about two Alaska Native teens, John Fredson and Esaias George, getting official credit for assisting historic Denali ascent in the Anchorage Daily News.

I can definitely go on about awesome people doing great things (or who have done), but I’ll stop here for now. Here’s one last shout-out to the new Miss Indigenous Northern Arizona University, Shondiin Mayo (Koyukon Athabascan/Navajo). Congratulations Shondiin on your new title and I know you will be a great role model!

The new Miss Indigenous NAU 2019 Shondiin Mayo was crowned recently. Photo courtesy of Miss Indian Northern Arizona University
The new Miss Indigenous NAU 2019 Shondiin Mayo was crowned recently. Miss Indigenous NAU 2019 First Attendant Brandi Espuma (Tohono O’odham) is also pictured. Photo courtesy of Miss Indian Northern Arizona University

 

Athabascan in the Spotlight
Alaska Native/Indigenous People, Athabascan in the Spotlight

Athabascan in the Spotlight – Glenda McKay

This summer, the Athabascan Woman Blog is featuring an Athabascan in the Spotlight each week. Thank you to Brenda Mahan (Koyukon Athabascan) for nominating Glenda McKay!

Glenda McKay is Ingalik-Athabascan. Her mother, Emily, was born in Flat, Alaska and grandmother, Eliza Tickeny, was born in Anvik, Alaska. Glenda is an artist known for creating miniature dolls using traditional materials. She also creates masks, charm baskets and knife sheaths. Glenda also does beadwork, like making octopus bags. She uses moose skin, walrus ivory, fossilized bone, seed beads, seal skin, whale baleen, sea otter fur and deer hide. One item can take several months, if not up to a year to create.

Glenda has won many awards for her artwork. She travels to many of the Native markets in the Lower 48, such as the Santa Fe Indian Market and the American Indian Arts Market place at the Autry Museum. She has been featured online and in magazines. Glenda received the 2017 Jackie Autry Purchase Award winner for her Yesterdays Warrior bag by the Autry Museum of the American West.

Glenda received the 2017 Jackie Autry Purchase Award winner for her Yesterdays Warrior bag by the Autry Museum of the American West. Photo by Autry Museum of the American West
Glenda received the 2017 Jackie Autry Purchase Award winner for her Yesterdays Warrior bag by the Autry Museum of the American West. Photo by Autry Museum of the American West

The Native American Artists, Musicians and Writers group featured her artwork on their Facebook page. View the page to see her impressive art work collection.

Glenda has been a mentor for Brenda Mahan for about three years now. Brenda says, “She is always willing to share tips of the trade. Her knowledge on Athabascan crafts is invaluable and she is willing to pass down her knowledge and this is why I am nominating her for the Athabascan in the Spotlight.”

Enaa baasee’ to Brenda for submitting Glenda McKay to be an Athabascan in the Spotlight! Do you have someone you admire, like a culture bearer, artist, storytellers, activist, role model, community doer, language warrior, leader, hunter, gatherer, parent, or grandparents? Find out more about how to submit a nomination here: http://athabascanwoman.com/?p=4248.

Alaska Native/Indigenous People, Athabascan in the Spotlight

Athabascan in the Spotlight Features

Athabascan in the Spotlight

Throughout the years, I have featured Athabascan people in my blog through interviews and by sharing our stories. Why? I want to raise people up, promote wellness and counter stereotypes. Let’s celebrate those we admire — our culture bearers, artists, storytellers, activists, role models, community doers, language warriors, leaders, hunters, gatherers, parents, and grandparents! Now, I would like to ask for your help.

To submit a nomination, please email me the following:

  • Your Name
  • Name of nominee (including Native name if applicable)
  • Cultural affiliation (like, Koyukon, Gwich’in, etc.)
  • Background on nominee (where they or their family is from, who their family is, what they do, etc.)
  • Reason this person should be recognized
  • Contact info for nominee (phone, email or social media)
  • Web and/or social media link
  • 1-3 photos (or links from public social media).

Email ayatlin@hotmail.com or message me on Facebook.

Let’s lift up and celebrate those we admire in the Athabascan community. Please contact me with any questions. Enaa baasee’!

Angniq Woods-Orrison her fiancé, Mitchell, visited the White Sands National Park. Courtesy photo
Alaska Native/Indigenous People

Angniq Woods-Orrison – Athabascan Wrestler

Angniq Woods-Orrison and her teammate Cheynell Kawaihai. Courtesy photo
Angniq Woods-Orrison and her teammate Cheynell Kawaihai. Courtesy photo

It is amazing how social media and a web presence can bring people together. I befriended Angniq Woods-Orrison (Koyukon Athabascan) on Instagram this summer. She posts inspirational stories touching on topics including identity, body confidence, personal goals and wrestling. I just had to find out more about Angniq, so was happy when she agreed to be interviewed for the Athabascan Woman Blog.

Angniq is from Rampart, Alaska. Her mother is Brooke Wright. Angniq was raised by her maternal grandparents, Arthur Joseph, Jr. and Janet Woods. Brooke was a teenage mother, and her parents became Angniq’s guardians as she finished school. Angniq said, “I was blessed to have met most of my great grandparents. My elders laid a great foundation for my identity as a child from a village along the Yukon, and as a Koyukon Athabascan.”

Angniq is the granddaughter of Elizabeth Wiehl, Jenny Joseph, Walter Woods and Judy (Starr) Woods. She has family ties to Tanana, Manley Hot Springs, and Angoon. Angniq grew up as one of the only babies-at the time-in Rampart, and felt an enormous amount of love and care. As a result, it gave her confidence, along with the ability to be bold and proud of who she was and where she came from.

“I went to a boarding school in the Southeast part of Alaska. I’m from the interior, I was 800 miles away from home. I’m a frequent traveler because of my distance from home, and also for competitions. I competed in #mehsxc #mehswrestling basketball #mehsNYO ❤💛 this was surprising for a #koyukonathabascan who is from the village of #rampartak which has less than 100 people. The Rampart school shutdown when I was a child, so I grew up between there and Fairbanks. I learned my cultural history, my songs, my dances, my subsistence lifestyle. I don’t know my language. The boarding school I went to was originally run by the BIA before being taken over by the state. During that time, it was a hospital for the tb epidemic, and a place native students where forced to go starting at the age of 4. This was an attempt at complete assimilation: often being abused mentally, physically, and sexually. This happened across the U.S, and this generation is still alive. I don’t know exactly what happened to my great grandmother, but she didn’t teach her children their language. My childhood is shaped around growing into, and unknowingly, healing from my family’s trauma by keeping my culture alive in myself, the next goal being to learn my language. Going to college in California for wrestling is a new part of my identity, and it’s important for me to further my education for my community, but at times it hurts to be away from home. This is my open book.” – Angniq Woods-Orrison (Koyukon Athabascan), posted on Instagram (@Angniq)

Angniq Woods-Orrison and her grandmother, Judy Woods. Courtesy photo
Angniq Woods-Orrison and her grandmother, Judy Woods. Courtesy photo

Many small Alaskan towns struggle with the minimum number of students to keep a school open. With less than 10 students, Rampart’s school shutdown before Angniq entered elementary school, so her family split time between the Rampart and Fairbanks. She struggled in a predominantly white elementary school, but found comfort when she attended Effie Kokrine Charter School. Angniq says, “This Native-staffed, -inspired, and -centered education opened up a new perspective to my Indigenous identity.”

Angniq had strong politically-active role models growing up, including her aunt, Georgianna Lincoln, and uncle, Albert Kookesh. She attended countless Native gatherings for her tribe, corporations, potlatches and festivals with her grandmother, Janet. This exposed her to the power, beauty, and love in Native communities.

Angniq attended Mt. Edgecumbe High School (MEHS) in Sitka, a boarding school which is 800 miles away from her hometown. She was encouraged to grow, accept challenges, and develop herself in every way. Angniq took extra classes, joined sports (cross country, wrestling, basketball, Native Youth Olympics), and joined battle of the books. She was inducted into a campus volunteer group (L.E.A.D.S), and was a member of the National Honor Society. Angniq graduated winning multiple regional and state championships, along with earning the Lillian Lane Award and the national Tricia Saunders award.

Angniq decided she wanted to wrestle in college, which meant she would have to find a school out of state. She attends Menlo College, and is a scholarship recipient and is working toward a degree in psychology. It has not been easy having to pay tuition to private school on top of her participation on the wrestling team, which like having a full-time job. At one point, she took more classes than she was comfortable and it hurt her grades. She was burnt out, but was thankful when countless people came to her aid from home and within my new Californian family. Angniq is currently a junior, has earned more scholarships to ease the financial burden. Her wrestling team has placed 7th and 5th in the nation. Despite having a full schedule and a part-time job, she has made it onto the Dean’s list and currently sit at a 3.4 GPA.

Angniq Woods Orrison enjoys spending time with her family. Courtesy photo
Angniq Woods Orrison enjoys spending time with her family. Courtesy photo

Hundreds of people have given Angniq support to help her achieve her goals, including her community along the Yukon River, a growing Indigenous community of friends, MEHS alumni/family, and her new international family.

The journey to success has not been a fast process for Angniq. She points out she did not start wrestling until she was a freshman in high school, and didn’t win a match until she was a senior. In 2015, Alaska sanctioned a girl’s state championships for the first time, and she became one of the first state champions. When she decided to wrestle in college, the process repeated.

Angniq also attributes her success to her family, friends, classmates, teachers, coaches and teammates. She says, “I’ve been financially supported, encouraged, tutored, pushed, yelled at, consoled, and guided in every way possible. To be alive is a testimony to our ancestor’s resilience in surviving genocide, assimilation and racism.”

Angniq was exposed to alcoholism or drugs and saw the impacts it had on people and knew at a young age she didn’t want to drink. She was inspired from Geraldine Charlie of Minto who told her story of family and sobriety at a Doyon meeting. Angniq draws strength from living her traditional lifestyle and practicing her culture. She loves fishing on the Yukon River and participating in cultural arts. One of her goals is to learn her language, Denaakk’e (Koyukon Athabascan). Angniq started learning words and tries to use them in everyday conversation. She appreciates being able to call upon relatives anytime she has questions.

“Alcohol was introduced to Native peoples as a tool of genocide, in the hopes that it would tear us apart. We struggle, but we still survive. The point I am trying to make is: we are burden with extreme hardships of mental health issues, poor health, and poverty within the Indigenous communities. This is another manifestation of white supremacy and it takes a great amount of knowledge and research to understand the systematic nature of this racial hegemony. There will be walls for Indigenous people no matter which direction life brings them, but there is a great liberation in the pursuit of happiness. As I continue to learn about America and my culture, I love myself more. As I continue to meet people from around the world, travel, and live an active lifestyle, I love myself more. At times, I am overwhelmed with oppression as a Native woman, and with the struggle to further my education, but it forced me to bloom in the most beautiful ways. Find your community, find yourself, and continue to live as a marker for our ancestors’ resilience.” – Angniq Woods-Orrison (Koyukon Athabascan)

Angniq Woods-Orrison her fiancé, Mitchell, visited the White Sands National Park. Courtesy photo
Angniq Woods-Orrison her fiancé, Mitchell, visited the White Sands National Park. Courtesy photo

After undergraduate college, Angniq’s goal is to earn a master’s degree. She hopes to work for the tribes, maybe in a village, at a corporation or for an Indigenous program. Angniq’s dream is to bring more mental health resources to Alaskan Natives (or any tribe) that encourage places to learn culture and language. She says, “With more mental health resources, I want to help people recover and strive away from addiction, depression and suicide. In empowering my own people, I want to help other oppressed groups of people, which include women, minorities, the LBTQ community and people of non-biblical faiths.”

I am impressed with how Angniq is working toward her goals and not giving up despite being far from home. She is the only Alaska Native on her campus, but connects with other Indigenous people on social media. Angniq learns about tribal issues on Twitter. Find her on Twitter at @beedubs767 and Instagram at @Angniq. Enaa baasee’ Angniq for sharing your story and inspiring others!

It took Brenda Mahan nearly two years to complete this Athabascan firebag. It is 9.5” x 10” with a 60” wool yarn strap which hangs approximately 30”. Brenda says, “It is beaded on both sides and lined with cotton fabric. I utilized size 11 Japanese seed beads and it is edged with size 6 Japanese seed beads. I utilized black wool broadcloth to create the piece. On each side, there is a main flower in the center. These flowers are old patterns that I attempted to re-create. Although the overall design is my original, I referenced Northern Athabascan Art, A Beadwork Tradition by Kate C. Duncan to design my piece and to determine what was used to create a firebag.” Courtesy photo
Alaska Native/Indigenous People

Brenda Mahan – Athabascan Beader

Athabascan Artist Brenda Mahan with her latest pieces of beadwork include a firebag, wall hanging and moose hide octopus bag. Photo by Angela Gonzalez
Athabascan Artist Brenda Mahan with her latest pieces of beadwork include a firebag, wall hanging and moose hide octopus bag. Photo by Angela Gonzalez

I have been admiring beadwork by Brenda Mahan for the past few years. She is Koyukon Athabascan with roots from Galena, Alaska and now lives in Nevada. Brenda was raised in Cordova, Alaska and is a shareholder of Chugach Alaska Corporation. Although she has a day job as a child support supervisor, she spends her free time beading. I consider her a master artist in beading.

Brenda’s adoptive parents are Pete and Marlene Laplante. Her birth grandparents were Johnson and Lilly Henry from Galena, Alaska. Brenda’s birth mother is Madeline Henry. Madeline is a beader, and collaborated with her late mother, Lilly Henry, to make several large coasters for the Governor’s Awards in Alaska in the 1982. Madeline and late Lilly also have a piece featured in Kate C. Duncan’s book, Some Warmer Tone Alaska Athabascan Bead Embroidery.

Brenda says, “Being adopted, I learned bead embroidery from books.” One such book was, Ann’s Creations: Designs & Instructions for Making Your Own Athabascan Beadwork by Ann Goessel, where she learned some of the basics to beading. In 2001, she ventured to make her first beaded barrette. In 2004, Brenda took a beading class taught by Athabascan bead artist, Delores Sloan, held at the Alaska Native Heritage Center. In 2009, Brenda decided to create floral beadwork with moose hide with a goal to sell it at Alaska Native Medical Center’s Gift Shop in Anchorage, Alaska. The ANMC Gift Shop is known for selling high quality traditional Alaska Native arts and crafts. Brenda said, “This was an honor for me to have my items accepted in this gift shop as it meant that my beadwork had met a high standard.”

Angela Gonzalez and Brenda Mahan meet in Anchorage
Angela Gonzalez and Brenda Mahan meet in Anchorage

Brenda was always drawn to beadwork and sewing and especially loves floral beadwork. She finds inspiration from nature. She grew up enjoying the wonders of Alaska, like beach combing, berry picking, hiking, skiing, snow machining, trapping, hunting and fishing. Brenda’s preferred materials include size 11 Japanese seed beads, nymo thread, porcupine quills, moose hide, dentallium shells and Ultra suede. Brenda uses the two-needle method which she believes makes her lines straighter and more controlled curves. This method came naturally to her, but designing has been more of a challenge.

“I love to work with the soft moose hide and the smell of smoked hide conjures up many feelings of happiness for me. There are not many people who bead on moose hide anymore due to the rising cost.” Brenda Mahan, Koyukon Athabascan

Beadwork brings Brenda closer to her Athabascan and Alaska Native people. She often shares her beadwork on a Facebook group, called Athabascan Showcase. Brenda enjoys connecting with people, and has even discovered some are distant relatives.

Brenda was honored to receive with several pages of floral patterns and a zipper pull mukluk pattern (signature piece) from Madeline. Brenda wishes she lived closer to Madeline so they could bead together. Brenda only met her late grandmother, Lilly Henry, once and treasures looking at pictures of her beadwork. Brenda adds an edge technique to some of her beadwork in honor of Lilly’s style of beadwork.

Brenda Mahan has spent over 100 hours making this moose hide octopus bag. She says, “Currently, the top is done and I am preparing to put it all together. The strap is done and I am lining that with hide using picot-edge beading. I plan to assemble the top in a similar manner. The tentacles will be lined separately from the bag so that eight tentacles hang down from the main bag. The bag will also be lined using picot-edge beading. I've add more details to the bag, little flowers all over.” Photo courtesy of Brenda Mahan
Athabacan Artist Brenda Mahan has spent over 100 hours making this moose hide octopus bag. She says, “Currently, the top is done and I am preparing to put it all together. The strap is done and I am lining that with hide using picot-edge beading. I plan to assemble the top in a similar manner. The tentacles will be lined separately from the bag so that eight tentacles hang down from the main bag. The bag will also be lined using picot-edge beading. I’ve add more details to the bag, little flowers all over.” Photo courtesy of Brenda Mahan

A close up view of Brenda Mahan's beadwork. Photo by Angela Gonzalez
A close up view of Athabascan Artist Brenda Mahan’s beadwork. Photo by Angela Gonzalez

Although, I am no expert at beading or determining if someone is a master bead artist, I feel Brenda’s artwork is exemplary. Her work reflects her extensive research on the style and technique of Athabascan beadwork. One of Brenda’s latest projects is a moose hide octopus bag. It is approximately 11” x 15” with beadwork on one side. Her center flower is her attempted to re-create using an older book called, Northern Athabascan Art, A Beadwork Tradition by Kate C. Duncan. Brenda says, “Sometimes I feel like I am connecting to that person when I try to re-create their old flower pattern. The patterns are more difficult than ones that I’ve done in the past. I’ve learned about color and contrast working with these more difficult patterns. I feel like the past speaks to me through my beadwork.”

Brenda studied several octopus bags in museums. However, she has never been able to handle one. The bag is going to be lined. The shape of the bag with the tentacles fascinates her, and she has enjoyed making it. Brenda has been careful in planning and creating the bag using old traditional flower patterns and moose hide throughout.

Angela Gonzalez wears earrings made by Athabascan Artist Brenda Mahan
Angela Gonzalez wears earrings made by Athabascan Artist Brenda Mahan

Brenda sells some of her beadwork at the Alaska Native Medical Center gift shop in Anchorage, Alaska and the Fallon Paiute Shoshone Tribe Fox Peak in Fallon, Nevada. You can view some of Brenda’s work on Facebook, Instagram and Pinterest.

Brenda is grateful to friends and mentors, like Emma Forsberg and Glenda McKay, for assistance during the process of learning to bead. Brenda’s dream is to bead an Athabascan baby belt. Although, she knows it will be a large, costly and time-consuming project, she’s looking forward to creating one with full moose hide. One day, Brenda also like to create moccasins, mittens and different types of traditional Athabascan bags. She would love to make these items with moose hide and in the traditional manner as it seems to be becoming a lost tradition (creating them entirely out of moose hide).

I recently met her in Anchorage. Her face lights up when she talks about her work and the process. If I know one thing about artists, it is the fact that they love discussing process. She brought three pieces of artwork with her, and I enjoyed seeing the detail of her work. Brenda’s beadwork almost looks 3D, and I thought some beads were raised. She assured me that it was not raised.

As you can see, Brenda is very talented Athabascan bead working and artist. I admire how much she invests into the planning and creation of each of her pieces. Ana basee’ Brenda for sharing your work and passion!

It took Brenda Mahan nearly two years to complete this Athabascan firebag. It is 9.5” x 10” with a 60” wool yarn strap which hangs approximately 30”. Brenda says, “It is beaded on both sides and lined with cotton fabric. I utilized size 11 Japanese seed beads and it is edged with size 6 Japanese seed beads. I utilized black wool broadcloth to create the piece. On each side, there is a main flower in the center. These flowers are old patterns that I attempted to re-create. Although the overall design is my original, I referenced Northern Athabascan Art, A Beadwork Tradition by Kate C. Duncan to design my piece and to determine what was used to create a firebag.” Courtesy photo
It took Brenda Mahan, an Athabascan artist, nearly two years to complete this Athabascan firebag. It is 9.5” x 10” with a 60” wool yarn strap which hangs approximately 30”. Brenda says, “It is beaded on both sides and lined with cotton fabric. I utilized size 11 Japanese seed beads and it is edged with size 6 Japanese seed beads. I utilized black wool broadcloth to create the piece. On each side, there is a main flower in the center. These flowers are old patterns that I attempted to re-create. Although the overall design is my original, I referenced Northern Athabascan Art, A Beadwork Tradition by Kate C. Duncan to design my piece and to determine what was used to create a firebag.” Courtesy photo

 

Athabascan Artist Brenda Mahan made this wall hanging, entitled Alaskan Angel. It is made of moose hide and is 10.5"x12". Brenda says, “Alaskan Angels flies high above the Northern Lights (which is the fringe) so that she can have the best view, constantly watching and guarding over everything. Her dog is her constant companion, watching over Alaskan Angel; pure love and always together. Just like her dog, Alaskan Angel will be loyal to you, watch over you and love you unconditionally. Believe in Angels.” Brenda donated it to the Friends of Pets Quilt Auction, which will take place on October 7, 2017, 11 am-2 pm at the University Center Mall in Anchorage, Alaska. Photo courtesy of Brenda Mahan
Athabascan Artist Brenda Mahan made this wall hanging, entitled Alaskan Angel. It is made of moose hide and is 10.5″x12″. Brenda says, “Alaskan Angels flies high above the Northern Lights (which is the fringe) so that she can have the best view, constantly watching and guarding over everything. Her dog is her constant companion, watching over Alaskan Angel; pure love and always together. Just like her dog, Alaskan Angel will be loyal to you, watch over you and love you unconditionally. Believe in Angels.” Brenda donated it to the Friends of Pets Quilt Auction, which will take place on October 7, 2017, 11 am-2 pm at the University Center Mall in Anchorage, Alaska. Photo courtesy of Brenda Mahan